Tag Archives: Kathy Lewis

Shortlist Nominees for the CWT Food Hero of the Year 2020 award

The Caroline Walker Trust (CWT) is delighted to announce the shortlist for the CWT Awards 2020 Food Hero of the Year.  The award celebrates individuals who work to campaign to improve public health through good food.

“Caroline Walker Trust awards are intended to highlight distinctive and outstanding work in promoting public health by maintaining and advancing standards of food and nutrition.  This year we acknowledge those who are striving to make a difference when times are tough, and there are so many changes to our daily lives” said Kathy Lewis, Interim Chair of the CWT

“The calibre of nominees for the Food Hero of the Year 2020 was extremely high, especially in the face of such unprecedented adversity.  Those shortlisted have shown their passion and resilience by adapting their work to meet the needs of other members in our society.” Kathy Lewis.

The official shortlist of the CWT 2020 Annual Awards showcases the high calibre of individuals working in a variety of settings to provide and improve the quality of our food and the nation’s diet.  The final shortlisted nominees for Food Hero of the Year comprised Ms Suzanne Fletcher (Founding Director of Nutrition Scotland), Ms Andrea Zick (Oxo Tower Restaurant), Pascal Gerrard (Founder, StreetCube) and Haleh Moravej (Founder, MetMUnch)

This year, the Judging Panels have witnessed some extraordinary efforts to campaign for good quality food over the past year, which includes both before and during Covid-19 lockdowns.  Learning about the lengths individuals have gone to provide good quality food fills us with the hope that we can collectively support each other’s health and wellbeing ” explained Kathy Lewis.

“The aim of these awards is to highlight the great work of others and to support those who are continuing to make a difference while inspiring a new generation of food heroes to do likewise,” said Kathy Lewis, Interim Chair of The Caroline Walker Trust.

CWT would like to congratulate all the shortlisted nominees and everyone who submitted nominations.  CWT would also like to thank the Judges for their hard work in judging the nominees from an impressive range of submissions.

For further information on the awards nominations: https://bit.ly/3jTIf2f

Contact Kathy Lewis [email protected] 07961 317 621

–ends—

Notes to the Editor

  1. For information on the background to the awards and how the result was arrived see: https://cwt.org.uk/the-caroline-walker-trust-awards-2020/
  2. The Caroline Walker Trust was founded in 1989 after the death of the distinguished nutritionist, writer and campaigner Caroline Walker. Established to continue her work and in her spirit, the CWT works tirelessly to promote the improvement of public health through good food. The work of CWT is particularly targeted towards vulnerable groups and people who need special help.
  3. This year the theme for the Awards is ‘To Triumph Through Adversity’. Unfortunately, due to Covid-19, the Reception and Awards Celebrations will now be held in 2021.
  4. The Caroline Walker Trust Logo:
  5. Suzanne Fletcher, Founding Director, Nutrition Scotland, said “It feels great to be nominated in two categories for the Food Hero of the Year. This year has been difficult for everyone but particularly so for our most vulnerable and disadvantaged communities. Being recognised in this way is a wonderful and welcome gesture of support.”
  6. Nutrition Scotland is a Social Enterprise in development; their aim is to improve health and wellbeing through improved access to a variety of nutritional services and information. Their services are designed and delivered by public health nutritionists and dietitians who believe in equal access to healthy food and reducing health inequalities. http://www.nutritionscotland.org/
  7. Andrea Zick, Oxo Tower Restaurant stated “This year has been very difficult for lots of people including myself, so to keep me grounded during these uncertain times I helped set up the community kitchen projects as a way of giving back to the community and bringing people together, which gave me a purpose during these uncertain times.
  8. OXO Community Kitchen was born out of the passion for reducing food waste, need to fight food poverty and Covid-19. OXO Tower Restaurant, Bar and Brasserie had been supporting StreetSmart for over 20 years.  Add to that a passion for reducing food waste, two professional kitchens not being used and a team of staff on furlough expressing an urge to volunteer and help fight food poverty. Mix them together, and in a flash, the OXO Community Kitchen was born.  With a desire to help, the OXO Tower Restaurant reached out to several great London charities in need of a kitchen.
  9. Continuing their relationship with StreetSmart and now newly partnered with FoodCycleStreets KitchenFeast With Us and Coin Street, the OXO Tower Restaurant have become part of a naturally formed alliance.  The OXO Tower’s furloughed team of 22 from all areas of the restaurant volunteered their time to cook the meals.  Starting small in the first week with 30 meals, OXO Community Kitchen ended week four by preparing over 1,400 meals.
  10. Pascal Gerrard, FRSA, Founder, StreetCube commented “We are incredibly proud and honoured to be nominated for the 2nd year running for The Caroline Walker Trust Food Hero of the Year Award.  It is a tremendous honour to be considered again this year on the shortlist, especially at this time when we enter yet another lockdown.  It is an extremely worrying time for so many, and StreetCube will remain open to provide healthy, nutritious, sustainable food for the community of Wandsworth.”
  11. StreetCube opened in May 2019 in Wandsworth SW London with the help of MasterChef Raymond Blanc. Every day, they serve hundreds of people with sustainable food, and also give out information about climate change and the effects of our food system on the environment. They are supported by a host of world-rebounded trusted advocates – people who are experts in sustainable food, climate change, nutrition, farming, organic food, chef training.
  12. The StreetCube project is a winning concept which aims to help transform food systems in every city to help cut CO2 and help reverse the effects of climate change effects from our food systems. By placing a cluster of StreetCube kitchens, the project can engage whole communities with a more sustainable food ethos.
  13. Haleh Moravej, Senior Lecturer, Nutritional Sciences, Founder, MetMUnch remarked:  “It is such an honour for our motivated and diverse community of MetMUnch students to be shortlisted as Food Hero of The Year 2020.  We would like to congratulate the other shortlisted nominees. We are very proud to be in the same category with such inspirational individuals.”   
  14. Over the past year, MetMUnch has worked with many students building their confidence and employability skills through the medium of healthy and sustainable food. Inspired by the pioneering work of Caroline Walker, we sent up our meat-free GROW Café in collaboration with our Catering Team. We served students and staff affordable, delicious, nutritious and sustainable food. We increased sales by 237%, but the real impact was a genuine change in attitudes and provision of healthy and nutritious food on campus.
  15. We have been supporting our students in lockdown with daily cooklongs, nutritional workshops and multicultural blogs. ‘Food Therapy’ became our way of dealing with uncertainty. There was even a collaborative budget cookbook created by students for students to combat food insecurity at University. Our MetMUnch students are always encouraged to find creative solutions to nutritional challenges, climate change and social problems, whilst developing leadership, collaboration, resilience, commitment, determination and perseverance. metmunch.com

Interview with Freelance Nutritionist of the Year Dr Laura Wyness   

Dr Laura Wyness, Registered Nutritionist, was awarded the title of ‘CWT Freelance Nutritionist of the Year 2019’ at last year’s CWT 30th Anniversary and Awards Reception for her outstanding and distinctive work in promoting public health and advancing standards of food and nutrition.

The judges were thrilled at how Laura’s work echoed the variety of work that Caroline Walker herself carried out.  Similar in many aspects of Caroline’s Walker own work, Dr Laura Wyness has worked in a variety of roles from nutritionist, writer, author and campaigner for better food.  Just like Caroline experienced, the journey has been one of surprises and fulfilment, and as the road curves, dips and turns there are many ways to make a contribution to improve the food we eat and the understanding of the effects on our diet.  Laura has certainly demonstrated how she’s followed in Caroline’s path.

Laura’s work as a freelance nutritionist involves researching and writing nutrition content for publications and company websites, providing workplace wellness talks to businesses and personalised nutrition advice to staff.

She is part of the team of coaches at Edinburgh’s InsideOut Personal Training, where she provides nutritional support to members in the form of ‘Ask the Nutritionist’ sessions online and has developed menu plans and healthy recipes.  She regularly assesses catering establishments for the Health Scotland’s ‘Healthy Living Award’ and provides advice on how to improve menu options.

Laura also regularly provides comments on nutrition for the media by working with journalists on articles, speaking on the radio, and writing nutrition tips for the recipes in the Ocado magazine.  She has helped build up a network of nutrition colleagues through volunteering as AfN Scottish Regional Rep and co-founding the @AfNutr twitter chats.

Since winning the CWT Freelance Nutritionist award, Laura has joined the expert team at Ocado magazine, and has featured in The Telegraph, NutraIngredients, Happiful magazine and Delicious magazine.  She has also spoken to nutrition students at various universities on nutrition careers and using social media as a nutrition professional.  She is continuing to grow her consultancy business and client base.

We caught up with Laura to see what life has been like since winning Freelance Nutritionist of the Year 2019 award.  Here’s what she had to say…

How did you feel when you were awarded Freelance Nutritionist of the Year 2019?

I was delighted to be invited to London for the Awards event.  I loved being in the same room as so many talented nutritionists and getting to meet and chat to others working in such a variety of nutrition roles.  It’s not often that the work of a Freelance Nutritionist is acknowledged, so I feel extremely grateful. To be recognised by the Caroline Walker Trust is such an honour.

Have you found your role as a Freelance Nutritionist a comfortable journey?

I worked in a variety of roles for several years before becoming a Freelance Nutritionist.  The experience I gained from working in academic research, policy development, supporting the food industry and nutrition communications provided such a useful insight and understanding of the role of nutrition in health and wellbeing.

When I first started as a Freelance Nutritionist almost 4 years ago, it was a very steep learning curve and quite a lonely experience.  However, I soon started to make use of the support available by going on business courses, attending networking events and joining groups like SENSE for self-employed nutritionists.

I love the work that I am able to do now and enjoy the opportunities that freelance work brings.   The recent lockdown situation has meant revising my business plans and ‘pivoting’ some of my services so I can now offer nutritional consultations and workplace nutrition talks online.

I wouldn’t say the journey into Freelance nutrition has been comfortable, as the growth (or magic) usually happens when you push yourself out of your comfort zone.  It’s certainly been an enjoyable experience and one that I continue to relish.

What is your advice to other Freelance Nutritionists?

Starting your own business can be hugely rewarding although quite scary at the same time.  I have found regular networking to be a vital part of growing my business and have learnt a great deal from connecting with freelancers in nutrition and other industries.

Seek out the support that is available.  The Association for Nutrition and the Regional AfN Facebook groups offer great support, and there are also lots of other useful Facebook groups for business advice, or for nutritionists working in specific areas where you can share advice and experiences.

It is also useful to give back and help others.  Being a Food and Drink Ambassador, mentoring early career nutritionists, volunteering as an AfN Rep, and delivering career talks to nutrition students are all ways to support other nutritionists and improve our profession. It can be a hugely rewarding experience.

What is the most rewarding part of your role as a Freelance Nutritionist?

It is an amazing learning experience, not just about nutrition, but also learning about running a business and your own self-development.  I feel is really important to communicate evidence-based nutrition information. I love being able to translate nutrition science into clear and practical messages and, above all, being able to pursue work that I find most interesting.

What have you gained from the award ‘Freelance Nutritionist of the Year’?

Winning this Award has boosted my confidence.  I feel I am still learning (and making mistakes) every day working as a freelance nutritionist, so to gain this recognition has given me a great sense of achievement.

What are the benefits of being recognised by CWT as an inspirational Nutritionist?

As a freelance nutritionist herself, Caroline Walker was passionate about improving public health through good food.  With the increasing issues we face in food security and inequality, Caroline left an inspiring legacy for nutritionists to continue.

I am extremely grateful for the support and recognition from the Caroline Walker Trust.  It has greatly inspired me to continue to promote the importance of public health nutrition.

 

Written by Kathy Lewis, R.Nutr., 2020

An Interview with the CWT Nutritionist of the Year 2019

Greg Lessons, Registered Nutritionist, was awarded the title of ‘CWT Nutritionist of the Year 2019’ at last year’s CWT 30th Anniversary and Awards Reception for his outstanding and distinctive work in the UK Fire Services and academic achievements.  At the time of the award, the judging panel found Greg had displayed precisely the qualities they were looking for in the next generation of inspiring nutritionists.   He had demonstrated courage in challenging the status quo, a significant & groundbreaking achievement of high potential and a passion for forging new pathways to further public health through improved nutrition awareness and quality of food.  The judges were unanimous.

Greg’s career started as a firefighter; however, after 17 years’ service, Greg began to notice the rising levels of poor health amongst his colleagues, namely heart disease, obesity and diabetes.  He decided to embark on a new vocation, and after completing his MSc in Human Nutrition, Greg pioneered the Fire Service’s nutrition programme.

His multi-component intervention involved face to face dietary, physical activity and lifestyle education programme, along with addressing the obesogenic environmental factors. His pilot trial lowered BMI, body fat percentage, energy intake and waist circumferences, thus reducing fire fighter’s risk of chronic disease within a month.   His research was published in the proceedings of the Nutrition Society, and he was announced as the winner of ‘Best Original Communication’ at the Nutrition Society 2017 Winter conference.

Greg has persisted with his studies and is now undertaking a PhD while providing part-time lecturing at London Metropolitan University.  However, he continues to lead the emergency services in improving nutrition and subsequent health of the workforce.  His latest activities also involve being a Nutritionist Ambassador for the UK Emergency Services Games. http://www.ukesg.uk/

Since winning the CWT Nutritionist of the Year award, Greg has been on BBC news, featured in Men’s Fitness magazine, NHD Network Health Digest, Personnel Today – Occupational Health & Wellbeing, Public Sector Catering, Emergency Service Times and received a fellowship at the Nutrition Society, and is now sitting on their strategic communications committee.

We caught up with Greg to see how he found life after receiving the Nutritionist of the Year 2019 award.  Here’s what he had to say…

How did you feel when you were awarded the Nutritionist of the Year 2019?
The great honour of being awarded ‘Nutritionist of the year 2019’ by the Caroline Walker Trust as it brings a certain level of validation to the work I have been engaged in over the last two years.

Have you found your role as a Nutritionist in a new environment a comfortable journey?
Far from being a smooth ride, there have been tough challenges along the way which have tested my fortitude and resolve from the very beginning. Getting the fire station nutrition programme off the ground involved a lengthy campaign with several setbacks.

What did you find was your biggest challenge being a Nutritionist?
Once approved to test its feasibility and efficacy on a grander scale, the daunting prospect of starting something completely new and leaving the familiarity of a role I had performed for the vast majority of my working life was itself a challenge. Added to that was the unknown quantity of how I would be received by my peers in a context which could be seen as ‘telling them what to eat and how to live’.

How did you overcome these challenges?
Every day I had to do battle with these fears to stand up in front of teams of firefighters to nervously (at the beginning) deliver my dietary intervention. Every day I had to overcome scepticism and suspicion before I could even begin to attempt changing dietary behaviours for the better. My fortitude, resilience and resourcefulness have truly been tested like never before, and it has changed me as a person. Imposter syndrome rears its head on a fairly regular basis, and I have had to adapt from working in a team to working alone, taking full responsibility for nutrition in my organisation.

 What is the most rewarding part of your role as a Nutritionist?
The knowledge that I’m helping people is rewarding, as is seeing markers for health improvement. The gratitude expressed from firefighters is also a huge boost and fuels me to keep going when the workload piles up.

What have you gained from the award ‘Nutritionist of the Year’?
The recognition from a well-respected nutrition organisation bestowing me with such a great honour has really inspired me to take my programme to the next level. It has instilled untold confidence and also supports the programme’s progression, which at times feels somewhat precarious.

What are the benefits of being recognised by CWT as an inspirational Nutritionist?
It has garnered both internal and external interest, from fire brigade personnel congratulating me, to media agencies approaching me for interviews. I welcome all of this attention with open arms, not to boost my ego, but to boost the profile of my programme and to highlight the importance of nutritionists in workplace settings. I cannot thank the Caroline Walker Trust enough for their incredible support.

We also asked about Greg’s typical day in the life as a trail-blazing Nutritionist.  Here is his average day’s schedule of events.  It’s impressively dedicated and hard-working.

 A day in my professional life
Wake up at 06:00 – head to the gym (You have to look the part).
08:00 – start work by checking email and dealing with admin.
09:45 – pack the car with anthropometric equipment and educational aids.
10:30 – arrive at the fire station, introduce myself and hastily attempt to allay personnel’s preconceived fears of my agenda.
11:00 – deliver interactive PowerPoint presentation to the watch on ‘Nutrition and Health’.
11:30 – hand out dietary assessment forms and hope they fill them out (99% of the time they do).
11:35 – I set up my personalised nutrition clinic in an appropriate room in the fire station. It comprises a body composition analyser, a height measurer, tape measure, laptop and visual aids.
11:45 – I see the first of anywhere between 8 and 20 firefighters for a personalised nutrition session.
16:30 – pack up equipment and drive back to my base where I’ll finish the day with more admin. This can include: scheduling appointments and stations to receive my intervention; creating nutrition educational materials for the LFB wellbeing intranet portal; writing reports to justify my mere existence; creating PowerPoint presentations; dealing with requests to attend various team meetings to deliver nutrition input to fire brigade support departments (I’ll have to do most of this in my own time tonight). (Note the absence of a lunch break!).
23:00 – close the laptop, go to bed and reflect upon some of the amazing people I met and the enriching interactions I was lucky enough to be part of. That’s the best bit of my job.

 

 

 

The Caroline Walker Trust Announce Award Winners

The winners of The Caroline Walker Trust Awards 2019 were announced at a special presentation ceremony held on Tuesday evening, 12th November, at Chandos House, Royal Society of Medicine in London.

The Caroline Walker Trust Awards were “intended to highlight distinctive and outstanding work in promoting public health by maintaining and advancing standards of food and nutrition.  Traditionally the Caroline Walker Trust only offered four awards; however, over the years, these have changed to reflect the dynamic environment in which the Trust operates.” Anka Johnston, Chair of CWT. This year, the trust offered six awards, which also included a Lifetime Achievement award, Food Hero of the Year, Media Campaigner of the Year and Charity Food Campaigner of the Year.

CWT would like to congratulate all the winners and runners-up of the CWT Awards 2019.

Below are the award winners and runners-up for each category:

Charity Food Campaigner of the Year

Winner: City Harvest
Runner-up: One Feeds Two

Laura Winningham, CEO at City Harvest:
“City Harvest was extremely proud to join leaders in the field of food and public health at the 30th Anniversary Caroline Walker celebration and thrilled to receive an award for our work as a Charity Campaigner. We believe everyone is entitled to affordable, nourishing food and City Harvest have delivered healthy surplus food for more than 7 million meals to more than 300 charity partners serving vulnerable Londoners.”

Food Hero of the Year

Winner: Jason O’Rourke
Runner-up: Nutrition Scotland

Jason O’Rourke, Headteacher at Washingborough Academy:
“It was such an honour to be awarded the Caroline Walker Trust ‘Food Hero of The Year’ award in recognition of the Food Education work that we have developed at Washingborough Academy and also with the TastEd charity. Teaching children the skills and knowledge about the food that they eat and how their informed choices can have such an important effect on their future health and well-being is a vitally important area of any child’s education. Schools can have such a positive impact on children’s relationship with food and I would hope that this award inspires more schools to include Food Education into their curriculum.”

Media Food Campaigner of the Year

Winner: Sabine Goodwin
Runner-up: Early Start Nutrition

Sabine Goodwin, Coordinator at Independent Food Aid Network:
“I am very honoured indeed to be the winner of the CWT Media Campaigner of the Year Award. I’m grateful for the recognition of my work to raise awareness of the significance of independent food aid providers as well as the scale of growing food insecurity in the UK. Caroline Walker was an inspiring campaigner who cared passionately about the health implications of living in poverty. She would certainly have been appalled to find that millions of people in the UK are unable to afford to buy food let alone healthy and nutritious food.

Nutritionist of the Year

Winner: Greg Lessons
Runner-up: Barbara Bray, MBE

Greg Lessons, Nutritionist at London Fire Brigade:
“I can’t thank the CWT enough for this incredible honour in recognition of my work for the London Fire Brigade. A huge thank you to everyone who has supported me along the way.”

Freelance Nutritionist of the Year

Winner: Laura Wyness
Runner-up: Shaleen Meelu

Laura Wyness, Freelance Registered Nutritionist based in Edinburgh:
“I am absolutely thrilled to have won this award from The Caroline Walker Trust.  The work and impact Caroline Walker made to public health nutrition has been very motivating for me in my nutrition career and I have found the resources produced by the Trust really useful in my work.  It is great to be recognised as a freelance nutritionist promoting the science behind healthy food and diets.”

The Caroline Walker Trust Lifetime Achievement Award

Professor Philip James

A special Lifetime Achievement Award was presented to Philip James who has supported the CWT since its inception and has made outstanding contributions to the nation’s food and health.

–ends—

Notes to the Editor

  1. For information on the background to the awards and how the result was arrived see: https://www.cwt.org.uk/cwt-announce-awards-short-list/
  2. The Caroline Walker Trust was founded in 1989 after the death of the distinguished nutritionist, writer and campaigner Caroline Walker. Established to continue her work and in her spirit, the CWT works tirelessly to promote the improvement of public health through good food. The work of CWT is particularly targeted towards vulnerable groups and people who need special help.
  1. This year is the 30th anniversary of the Trust and the theme for the evening is Affordable food: Affordable health. The speakers included Felicity Lawrence, Guardian Journalist; Peter Stefanovic, Social Injustice Campaigner and distinguished Lawyer; and Dan Crossley, Executive Director at the Food Ethics Council.
  1. The Caroline Walker Trust Logo:

  1. The Nutritionist of the Year award has been sponsored by the Nutrition Society nutritionsociety.org and the Association for Nutrition www.associationfornutrition.org
  2. The Nutrition Society of the UK and Ireland was established in 1941 and is one of the largest learned societies for nutrition in the world. With over 2,600 members internationally, the Society is dedicated to delivering its mission of advancing the scientific study of nutrition and its application to animal and human health. The Society disseminates and promotes nutrition science through its six journals and six textbooks, in addition to regularly organising CPD endorsed conferences and webinars. Working with universities, parliamentarians, industry representatives, academic researchers, and other membership organisations, the Society aims to create opportunities for building relationships that strengthen research and collaboration within the field. Membership is open to any individual with an interest in nutritional science.
  3. The Freelance Nutritionist of the Year award has been sponsored by SENSE and the Nutrition Society nutritionsociety.org                     
  4. SENSE is the original unique network for professional self-employed Registered Nutritionists and Registered Dietitians. It exists to provide members with professional development, support and advice. Founded in 1996 by Dr Margaret Ashwell as  ‘Self Employed Nutritionists’  Support and Enlightenment’. SENSE now has more than 70 members and a flourishing CPD programme of twice-yearly meetings. http://www.sense-nutrition.org.uk   
  5. The Association for Nutrition (AfN) holds the UK Voluntary Register of Nutritionists (UKVRN), a register of competent, qualified nutrition professionals who meet our rigorously applied standards for scientifically sound evidence-based nutrition and its use in practice.  The UK Voluntary Register of Nutritionists is the only register of qualified nutritionists recognised by Public Health EnglandNHS Choices and NHS Careers                                                                                                     
  6. City Harvest has rescued over 7 million meals, collecting and delivering 80,000 meals a week from supermarkets, wholesale markets, manufacturers and the hospitality industry. Their trademark fleet of temperature-controlled vans delivers to over 300 London community programmes, including homeless shelters, mental health community projects, family centres, children’s’ programmes, and domestic abuse refuges. http://www.cityharvest.org.uk/
  1. Jason O’Rourke is the Headteacher at Washingborough Academy, Lincolnshire and the Founder of TastEd. Jason’s work with Washingborough Academy featured extensively in the Government’s 2016 Childhood Obesity Strategy and Plan for Action as best practice in food education and changing food cultures.  Jason’s school has also become the first in the country to receive the Gold Award from the Soil Association’s ‘Food for Life Served Here’ programme.  The School won the School Food Plan Award 2016.  It also was a finalist in the Times Education Supplement Healthy School of the Year award in 2016 and 2017. Jason is also the winner of the Educatering School food Plan Awards in 2016 and was invited to be a Headteacher advisor to the Government Department of Health and Social Care. washingboroughacademy.org and www.tasteeducation.com
  1. Sabine Goodwin was a television news and investigative journalist. Sabine now coordinates the Independent Food Aid Network (IFAN) and advocates on behalf of its members. Sabine is challenging the government on its policies towards poverty to eradicate food poverty. In 2017 Sabine created a database of independent food banks working across the UK, that highlighted how many food banks were outside the mainstream funded activities.  In addition to the Trussell Trust’s 1200 food banks, Sabine has discovered another 800 hidden food banks, making a total of 2000. Her research was first published in the Guardian in May 2017.  Since then, Sabine has raised the profile of independent food aid providers with the media, ministers, academics and other charities. Sabine works collaboratively with others, including running a joint project with ‘A Menu for Change’ to collate food parcel distribution data from Scottish independent food banks and with Sustain and other members of the End Hunger UK alliance to highlight food insecurity. Sabine also worked as the producer of Food Bank As It Is – a play depicting the reality of food banks.  Added to this Sabine is also now working independently of IFAN with Dr Rachel Loopstra at Kings College London undertaking research on independent food banks in England.
  1. Greg Lessons is a Nutritionist at the London Fire Brigade. Greg works with firefighters to develop personalised nutrition plans, helping them to make healthier food choices, and also holds food preparation master classes with firefighters across the capital.
  1. Dr Laura Wyness was a Senior Research Fellow for three years in the Scottish Centre for Food Development and Innovation, Edinburgh where she led a range of research projects to help companies reformulate or develop new healthier products. She now works as a Freelance Registered Nutritionist based in Edinburgh https://www.laurawyness.com/.

CWT announced shortlist for Media Food Campaigner of the Year

The Caroline Walker Trust (CWT) is delighted to announce the shortlist for CWT Awards 2019 Media Food Campaigner of the Year.  The award celebrates journalists and social media writers who work to campaign to improve public health through good food within the media.

The awards ceremony will be held on 12 November 2019 at the RSM Chandos House.  Professor Tim Lang, President of the CWT, will be presenting the award to the winner of each category.  Traditionally the Caroline Walker Trust has offered several awards.  This year the awards include Food Hero, Charity Food Campaigner, Nutritionist and Freelance Nutritionist as well as Media Food Campaigner of the Year and Lifetime Achievement Award.

“Caroline Walker Trust awards are intended to highlight distinctive and outstanding work in promoting public health by maintaining and advancing standards of food and nutrition.  Traditionally the Caroline Walker has offered four awards; however, over the years, these have changed to reflect the dynamic environment in which the Trust operates,” remarked Anka Johnston, Chair of the CWT.

This year, the Trust has offered six awards, which also includes a Lifetime Achievement award, Charity Food Campaigner of the Year, Nutritionist of the Year and Freelance Nutritionist of the Year and Media Campaigner of the Year.”

The official shortlist of the CWT 30th Anniversary Awards showcases the high calibre of individuals working in a variety of mediums to improve the quality of our food and the nation’s diet.  The final shortlisted nominees for Media Food Campaigner of the Year comprised Rhiannon Lambert, Sabine Goodwin, Pixie Turner, Early Start Nutrition and AfN Twitter.

“The aim is to highlight the great work of individuals and teams who operate within the media environment, to support those who are continuing to make a difference while inspiring a new generation of media food campaigners to do likewise,” said Anka Johnston, Chair of the CWT.

“I’m very honoured to have been shortlisted for the CWT 30th Anniversary ‘Media Food Campaigner of the Year’ award for my work on behalf of IFAN.  Here’s hoping we’ll see the end of the need for charitable food aid as soon as possible,” responded Sabine Goodwin, Coordinator at the Independent Food Aid Network (IFAN).

 “I truly believe all health professionals have a responsibility to share their evidence-based advice far beyond the confines of a clinic or hospital with social media the most accessible platform for us to champion positive change. With an ever-increasing number of self-proclaimed health gurus born online whose nutritional qualification is nothing more than a lifetime of eating, we must fight the culture of celebrities emerging as authorities on nutrition and health,” Rhiannon Lambert, Registered Nutritionist.

“We feel very honoured to be shortlisted for the Caroline Walker Trust Awards. The @AfNutr team are passionate about providing evidence-based, practical messages around food, diet and health to a wide audience through social media.  We are grateful to our followers for their incredible support and positive feedback” responded Dr Laura Wyness, Registered Nutritionist, AfN Twitter

“We are so honoured to be shortlisted for the CWT Food Media Campaigner of the Year.  It’s so important for us to use media in a positive way to share evidence-based advice to improve health outcomes,” commented a spokesperson from Early Start Nutrition.

CWT would like to congratulate all the shortlisted nominees and everyone who submitted nominations.  CWT would also like to thank the Judges for their hard work in drawing up the shortlist from a very impressive list of nominations.

–ends—

Notes to the Editor

  1. For information on the background to the awards and how the result was arrived see: https://www.cwt.org.uk/cwt-announce-awards-short-list/
  1. The Caroline Walker Trust was founded in 1989 after the death of the distinguished nutritionist, writer and campaigner Caroline Walker. Established to continue her work and in her spirit, the CWT works tirelessly to promote the improvement of public health through good food. The work of CWT is particularly targeted towards vulnerable groups and people who need special help.
  1. This year is the 30th anniversary of the Trust and the theme for the evening is Affordable food: Affordable health. The speakers included Felicity Lawrence, Guardian Journalist; Peter Stefanovic, Social Injustice Campaigner and distinguished Lawyer; and Dan Crossley, Executive Director at the Food Ethics Council.
  1. The Caroline Walker Trust Logo:
  1. Rhiannon Lambert is a Registered Nutritionist specialising in weight management, eating disorders and sports nutrition. Founder of the leading Harley Street clinic Rhitrition, bestselling author of Re-Nourish: A Simple Way To Eat Well and Food For Thought podcast host. Registered with the Association for Nutrition (RNutr), Rhiannon obtained a first-class Bachelor (BSc) degree in Nutrition and Health and a Master’s (MSc) degree in Obesity, Risks and Prevention. She is also a Master Practitioner in Eating Disorders and Obesity having obtained a diploma from The National Centre For Eating Disorders approved by The British Psychological Society (BPS).  https://rhitrition.com/
  2. The @AfNutr Twitter team are Registered Nutritionists Vicki Pyne, Lynn Burns, Dr Suzanne Zaremba and Dr Laura Wyness. @AfNutr ‘s target audience is registered nutritionists, but others are also welcome irrespective of their background, occupation or experience on twitter. AfNutr’s followers include registered dietitians, medics, teachers and members of the public, as well as nutritionists. The @AfNutr Twitter webpage is https://afnutr.wordpress.com.
  1. Sabine Goodwin was a television news and investigative journalist. Sabine now coordinates the Independent Food Aid Network (IFAN) and advocates on behalf of its members. Sabine is challenging the government on their policies towards poverty to eradicate food poverty. In 2017 Sabine created a database of independent food banks working across the UK, that highlighted how many food banks were outside the mainstream funded activities.  In addition to the Trussell Trust’s 1200 food banks, Sabine has discovered another 800 hidden food banks, making a total of 2000. Her research was first published in the Guardian in May 2017.  Since then, Sabine has raised the profile of independent food aid providers with the media, ministers, academics and other charities. Sabine works collaboratively with others, including running a joint project with ‘A Menu for Change’ to collate food parcel distribution data from Scottish independent food banks and with Sustain and other members of the End Hunger UK alliance to highlight food insecurity. Sabine also worked as the producer of Food Bank As It Is – a play depicting the reality of food banks.  Added to this Sabine is also now working independently of IFAN with Dr Rachel Loopstra at Kings College London undertaking research on independent food banks in England.
  1. Pixie Turner started the Instagram account and blog ‘Plantbased Pixie’ in 2014, which has now grown to over 100,000 followers. Under this brand name, she worked as a blogger, social media influencer, speaker, writer, events organiser, and freelance Nutritionist she specialises in healthy plant-based recipes and debunking nutrition myths in the wellness industry.
  1. The Early Start Nutrition team promote positive attitudes and enjoyment of nutritious food to ensure the best possible start in life for all! The team have developed invaluable resources and training material to promote evidence-based messages to tackle nutrition inequalities and improve the health and well-being of young children and their families. 
  1. The Early Start Nutrition team has been at the heart of communities in East London for over 20 years providing support services for children, families and professionals. Their Association for Nutrition registered nutritionists, Edwina Revel and Georgia Leech, are some of the UK’s leading professionals in the industry delivering evidence-based interventions with a proven track record of improving health outcomes. The team are renowned for the delivery of projects that meet best practice and reduce inequalities in child development, health and life chances. Their priority is to ensure that all children have equal opportunities to receive ample nutrition and recognise the early years as a key time to build foundations that support children to be healthier.
  1. Early Start Nutrition deliver services shaped around local and national policies which are translated into practical and accessible services. They have represented their profession at national and international conferences and are frequently featured in leading early year’s magazines. The team are experts in maternal, child and family nutrition and have supported the London Borough of Newham to reduce the number of children who are overweight at reception by 2.5%! The team are currently working with the Dental Wellness Trust to ensure children in Newham have the opportunity to have healthier smiles byintegrating a Supervised Tooth Brushing programme into their daily routines. Visit their website to find out more about their full range of services https://www.earlystartgroup.com/nutrition/.

 

CWT announced shortlist for Charity Food Campaigner of the Year

The Caroline Walker Trust (CWT) is delighted to announce the shortlist for CWT Awards 2019 Charity Food Campaigner of the Year.  The awards celebrate the best of those who work to campaign to improve public health through good food.

The awards ceremony will be held on 12 November 2019 at the RSM Chandos House.  Professor Tim Lang, President of the CWT, will be presenting the award to the winner of each category.  Traditionally the Caroline Walker Trust has offered several awards.  This year, the trust has introduced the award for Charity Food Campaigner of the Year.

“Caroline Walker Trust awards are intended to highlight distinctive and outstanding work in promoting public health by maintaining and advancing standards of food and nutrition.  Traditionally the Caroline Walker only offered four awards; however, over the years, these have changed to reflect the dynamic environment in which the Trust operates,” remarked Anka Johnston, Chair of The CWT.

This year, the Trust has offered six awards, which also includes a Lifetime Achievement award, Food Hero of the Year, Media Campaigner of the Year, Nutritionist of the Year and Freelance Nutritionist of the Year,” explained Anka Johnston.

The official shortlist of the CWT 30th Anniversary Awards showcases the high calibre of charities working in a variety of areas to improve the quality of our food and the nation’s diet.  The final shortlisted nominees for Charity Food Campaigner of the Year comprised City Harvest, Henry, the Institute of Grocery Distribution (IGD), One Feeds Two and Sustain.

The aim is to highlight the great work of Charities, to support those who are continuing to make a difference while inspiring a new generation of campaigners to do likewise,” said Anka Johnston, Chair of The CWT.

Kath Dalmeny, CEO, Sustain commented: “The Sustain alliance’s work on children’s food and food quality has been profoundly inspired by Caroline Walker. Her pioneering spirit lives on in our campaigns for good food education, high-quality school meals and defence against the promotion of junk food. Every campaign win along the way is a tribute to her approach. Sustain is honoured to be associated with Caroline’s work and legacy.”

“Being shortlisted for this award is a wonderful recognition of the incredible power of a school meal. The school meals donated by our partners contribute to a number of Sustainable Development Goals, by supporting nutrition and fuelling learning and play at school,” responded Owen Burton, Co-Founder, One Feeds Two.

“For the past decade, HENRY has been helping some of our most vulnerable families overcome the negative effects of disadvantage. We support families to make positive lifestyle changes and create healthier home environments – helping parents gain the confidence and skills to give their children a great nutritional start,” explained Kim Roberts, Henry CEO.

Natasha Maynard, Nutrition & Scientific Affairs Manager at IGD, said: “With nearly four million people employed by the food and grocery industry, we have a unique opportunity to positively influence their health. Our ambitious research with the University of Cambridge proves how simple changes can encourage people to make healthier choices at work. We are absolutely delighted to have been shortlisted.”

“Knowing there is more than enough highly nutritious surplus food in London to feed those living in poverty, is what drives the City Harvest team. Growing our networks and increasing our capacity to deliver food, for free, to those in need is our lifeblood. Food is life – we give food another life,” said Laura Winningham, CEO, City Harvest London.

CWT would like to congratulate all the shortlisted nominees and everyone who submitted nominations.  CWT would also like to thank the Judges for their hard work in drawing up the shortlist from a very impressive list of nominations.

For further information on the awards nominations: http://bit.ly/2Or9FAw

Contact Kathy Lewis [email protected] 07961 317 621

–ends—

Notes to the Editor

  1. For information on the background to the awards and how the result was arrived see: https://www.cwt.org.uk/cwt-announce-awards-short-list/
  2. The Caroline Walker Trust was founded in 1989 after the death of the distinguished nutritionist, writer and campaigner Caroline Walker. Established to continue her work and in her spirit, the CWT works tirelessly to promote the improvement of public health through good food. The work of CWT is particularly targeted towards vulnerable groups and people who need special help.
  3. This year is the 30th anniversary of the Trust and the theme for the evening is Affordable food: Affordable health. The speakers included Felicity Lawrence, Guardian Journalist; Peter Stefanovic, Social Injustice Campaigner and distinguished Lawyer; and Dan Crossley, Executive Director at the Food Ethics Council.
  1. The Caroline Walker Trust Logo:
  2. City Harvest has rescued over 7 million meals, collecting and delivering 80,000 meals a week from supermarkets, wholesale markets, manufacturers and the hospitality industry. Their trademark fleet of temperature-controlled vans deliver to over 300 London community programmes, including homeless shelters, mental health community projects, family centres, children’s’ programmes, and domestic abuse refuges. http://www.cityharvest.org.uk/
  3. One Feeds Two partners with a variety of companies involved in the food industry in the UK and USA – from casual dining to brands, manufacturers, caterers and retailers. They enable them to make a positive, tangible social impact through their one-for-one model. For each licensed product sold by a partner, they donate the cost of a school meal for a child in one of the world’s poorest communities. One Feeds Two save their partners from having to run a charity as well as a business, giving them access to a mechanism that is easily communicated to staff, customers, investors and other stakeholders. One Feeds Two partners have donated more than 6 million school meals and are now donating nearly 3 million school meals p.a. through their operations in the UK and the USA. A school meal can have a transformative impact on a child’s day, allowing them to attend school rather than work, scavenge or beg for food – fuelling their ability to study and play. Regularly delivered school meals can have a transformative impact on a community’s level of educational attainment and the numerous downstream benefits of improved literacy and numeracy. URL: www.onefeedstwo.org
  1. HENRY is passionate about babies and young children getting the best possible start in life. They are a charity providing a wide range of support for vulnerable families in the early and childhood years. HENRY also train health and early years professionals to support families to make real and lasting changes that will help children to get off to a healthy and happy start and flourish throughout childhood and beyond. https://www.henry.org.uk/
  2. Sustain is the alliance for better food and farming advocates food and agriculture policies and practices that enhance the health and welfare of people and animals, improve the working and living environment, enrich society and culture and promote equity. https://www.sustainweb.org/about/
  3. IGD (Institute of Grocery Distribution) is a research and training charity that sits at the heart of the food and consumer goods industry. IGD’s healthy eating initiatives bring people and organisations from the breadth of the food industry together to promote healthy balanced diets.